RADIOALUMNI.CA

CANADIAN EPICS IN RADIOCOMMUNICATION

ALUMNI WHO LIVED THE ADVENTURE OF RADIO

WIRELESS TELEGRAPHISTS  -  SPARKS  -  RADIO PIONEERS

RADIO OPERATORS  -  RADIO TECHNICIANS

RADIO TECHNOLOGISTS  -  RADIO ENGINEERS

RADIO INSPECTORS  -  SPECTRUM MANAGERS

ÉPOPÉES CANADIENNES EN RADIOCOMMUNICATION

LES ANCIENS QUI ONT VÉCU L'AVENTURE DE LA RADIO

TÉLÉGRAPHISTES SANS FIL  -  PIONNIERS DE LA RADIO

OPÉRATEURS RADIO  -  TECHNICIENS RADIO

TECHNOLOGUES RADIO  -  INGÉNIEURS RADIO

INSPECTEURS RADIO  -  GESTIONNAIRES DU SPECTRE

Home Page

Page d'accueil

What's New ?

Quoi de neuf ?

Main Menu

Menu Principal

Roll Call

Appel nominal

Timeline

Chronologie

Topics

Sujets

Documents

Documents

Contact Us

Nous rejoindre

 

(French text follows English text  -  Texte en français suit le texte en anglais)

 

1997

IC Pitches in to Beat the Flood of the Century

Officials pronounced it the worst flood of the century

MICHEL MILOT

 

 

There were times when the tops of street signs

like these were a hazard to navigation

for Dan Lemoine's canoe

 

The roof of your home was the last place

to put furniture and personal effects

before the water comes in

 

Dyke reinforcements, DND style

 

Wanna buy some Manitoba property?

The added irony is that the top part of the

For Sale sign boasts "river frontage"

 

As a result of drainage from heavy snowfalls this past winter, the Red River crested at Winnipeg on May 3rd, 1997 at a heart-stopping 7.5 metres above normal. Some 27,400 Manitobans had to evacuate their homes and businesses.

 

Among the personnel deployed to help the emergency operations were 8,400 members of the Canadian Forces, 225 of the Coast Guard, and Industry Canada's emergency communications people. Across Canada we saw photos and videos of the backbreaking work as more than ten million sandbags were made and used to keep back the surging waters. For the most part, our people were engaged in the emergency communications infrastructure, which was as vital to the stemming of the floodwaters as the dykes.

 

Reliable telecommunications systems are essential from the onset of any emergency operation. The systems installed to assist the emergency organizations in Manitoba worked well and were key to the success of relief efforts. Another indispensable element was the exceptional cooperation between all levels of government, private organizations and the general public.

 

From the Start


Industry Canada was deeply involved from the first days of this emergency. The Department played a consultative role to communications users, authorizing additional frequencies for essential telecommuni-cations networks, including many frequencies for the military. Our Manitoba District Office arranged for cellular service providers to increase their channel capacity, including microwave links, and to relocate the stations that were in danger. This considerable task, requiring precision and a high level of expertise, was completed in very short order.

Our Department worked with NAVCAN and DND for clearance of special aeronautical assignment for search and rescue. IC also offered resources to the provincial Emergency Operations Centre. With Stentor and ATT Canada, we tried to ensure that there would be no overload of networks or failures of the principle routes that physically cross the flooded areas.

Our people established close contacts with all broadcasters in the Winnipeg area to help them play a very important public information role in the communities. Some broadcasters were authorized to use special parameters to increase their coverage or to set up alternate transmitters in a safer area. Amateur radio associations provided operators in each of the evacuated communities to keep communica-tions open, as well as for communications between operations centres and worksites where dyking was taking place. Everybody pitched in.
 

Personal Threat


Daniel Lemoine from our PNWT office had a definite personal interest in stemming the flood. His house, situated South of Winnipeg along the Red River, was threatened by the floodwaters. Dan and his family had to evacuate. But during the nine days encompassing the river's crest, when many held their breath and hoped for the best, Dan returned to his home and the exhausting chore of maintaining his sandbag dyke against the floodwaters and pumping out water which continually seeped under. But, as Regional Emergency Telecommunications Officer, he had broader duties to fulfill. So all through this period, his cellular phone and pager let him remain in regular contact with local and Ottawa emergency officials, as well as his family.

Although the overflow of the Red River was controlled so that Winnipeg was not flooded, damage to many Manitoba towns, homes and farmlands was devastating. Farmers watched helplessly as livestock drowned and were swept away, presenting the additional spectre of contaminated water supplies from the decomposing animals. The very worst scenario did not happen, but for many Manitobans the calamitous disaster is not yet over since houses and civic infrastructure have yet to be repaired or rebuilt.

 

The last flood of this magnitude in Canada was in 1826. Let's hope it never happens again.


Fund Raiser Gets Wet


It was appropriate, in a way, that the Fund Raiser BBQ held on May 9th in Ottawa took place in the rain. Afterall, its purpose was to help the victims of the Manitoba flood, so getting wet in the process had a kindred feel.
 

More than 3,000 people accepted the invitation from Western Economic Diversification to enjoy the hospitality of Constitution Square Park with live music, food from Loeb and drinks donated by Coca Cola. Among the wet participants was Minister Manley, braving the spattering rain under a big blue umbrella. Marian Kremers, a flood victim who had arrived in Ottawa the day of the BBQ showed Mr. Manley photos of her flooded house. "It means a lot to me to see this kind of support," she said.

 

Organizers Marty Muldoon and Phil Rodrigue calculated that the amount of money raised exceeded $37,000, which was matched with a commitment of $50,000 from the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton. Marty was very happy with the results and told Argus that "it would not have been remotely possible without the generous support of the corporate community of the NCR."

So even though we couldn't be there, people in Ottawa did lend a hand to our western neighbours in their time of need.

 

 

1997

Inondations au Manitoba
Les employés d'Industrie Canada appelés à la rescousse

Selon les représentants officiels, c'est la pire inondation du siècle

MICHEL MILOT

 

 

À certains moments, la partie supérieure

des plaques de rue présentait un danger pour

Daniel Lemoine lorsqu'il se déplaçait en canot

 

Le toit des maisons était le dernier endroit

où placer les meubles et les effets personnels

avant que l'eau n'envahisse les lieux

 

Renforcement des digues

à la manière de la Défense nationale

 

Une propriété au Manitoba, ça vous intéresse? Ironie du sort, la pancarte « À vendre » portait la mention « Accès à la rivière »

 

Le 3 mai dernier à Winnipeg, sous l'effet des lourdes chutes de neige qui se sont produites cet hiver au Manitoba et au sud de la frontière américaine, les eaux de la rivière Rouge ont atteint un niveau sans précédent, dépassant de plus de 7,5 mètres leur niveau normal. Quelque 27 400 Manitobains ont alors dû abandonner leur foyer et leur travail.

 

Environ 8 400 membres des Forces canadiennes, 225 employés de la Garde côtière et les employés d'Industrie Canada chargés des communications d'urgence faisaient partie du personnel déployé dans le cadre des opérations d'urgence. Partout au pays, les journaux et la télévision nous ont montré sur le vif le travail épuisant accompli par les équipes qui ont transporté plus de 10 millions de sacs de sable pour endiguer le débordement des flots. Les employés d'Industrie Canada étaient surtout chargés de l'infrastructure des communications d'urgence, rôle qui s'est révélé tout aussi crucial pour contenir les eaux que l'aménagement de digues.

 

Dès le début de toute opération d'urgence, il est essentiel de disposer de systèmes de télécommuni-cations fiables. Les systèmes mis en place pour aider les équipes de secours au Manitoba ont bien fonctionné et ont permis d'assurer le succès des efforts déployés sur le terrain. La coopération exceptionnelle entre les pouvoirs publics de tous les paliers, les organismes privés et la population a fait le reste.
 

Dès le départ
 

Industrie Canada est intervenu dès les premiers jours. Le Ministère a joué un rôle consultatif auprès des utilisateurs des communications, autorisant l'attribution de fréquences supplémentaires destinées à des réseaux de télécommunications essentiels, notamment ceux des Forces armées. Grâce à notre bureau de district du Manitoba, les fournisseurs de services téléphoniques cellulaires ont pu accroître la capacité de leurs canaux, entre autres sur le plan des liaisons hertziennes, et on a pu reloger les stations menacées. Ce travail colossal, qui exigeait précision et compétence, a été effectué sans délai.

Afin d'autoriser des missions aéronautiques spéciales de recherche et sauvetage, le Ministère a travaillé en collaboration avec NAVCAN et avec le ministère de la Défense nationale. Industrie Canada a également offert des ressources au Centre des opérations d'urgence du Manitoba. De concert avec Stentor et ATT Canada, nous nous sommes efforcés de faire en sorte qu'il n'y ait aucune surcharge des réseaux ni aucune défaillance des lignes de communication traversant les zones inondées.

Notre personnel a travaillé en étroite collaboration avec tous les radiodiffuseurs de la région de Winnipeg, les aidant à jouer un rôle d'information publique très important dans les collectivités. Certains ont été autorisés à utiliser des paramètres spéciaux afin d'élargir la zone desservie ou à mettre en place des émetteurs de rechange dans un secteur plus sûr. Les associations de radio-amateurs ont dépêché des opérateurs dans chacune des collectivités évacuées afin de garder le contact et de permettre la communication entre les centres des opérations et les chantiers où l'on aménageait des digues. Tous ont courageusement retroussé leurs manches.
 

Touché de près
 

Daniel Lemoine, qui travaille à notre bureau de la région des Prairies et des Territoires du Nord-Ouest, avait de bonnes raisons de lutter contre l'inondation car sa maison, située au sud de Winnipeg le long de la rivière Rouge, était menacée par les flots. Daniel et sa famille ont dû évacuer les lieux. Toutefois, au cours des neuf jours qu'a duré la crue de la rivière, alors que bien des gens se croisaient les doigts et conjuraient le sort, Daniel est retourné chez lui où il a travaillé d'arrache-pied pour maintenir en place son barrage de sacs de sable et de pomper l'eau qui s'infiltrait constamment sous les sacs. Cependant, en tant qu'agent régional des télécommunications d'urgence, il avait une mission d'intérêt public. Tout au long de cette période, grâce à son téléphone cellulaire et à son téléavertisseur, il est demeuré régulièrement en contact avec les représentants officiels chargés de la situation sur place et à Ottawa, ainsi qu'avec sa famille.

Si la catastrophe a pu être évitée dans le cas de Winnipeg, bon nombre de villes, de villages, de maisons et de terres agricoles du Manitoba n'ont pas échappé à l'effet dévastateur de la crue. Les agriculteurs ont assisté, impuissants, à la noyade de leur bétail emporté par les eaux; on craignait en outre la contamination de l'eau par les animaux en décomposition. Si le pire a pu être évité, de nombreux Manitobains ne sont pas encore vraiment tirés d'affaire puisqu'il faut encore réparer ou reconstruire des maisons et des infrastructures municipales.

 

La dernière inondation de cette ampleur au Canada a eu lieu en 1826. Espérons que celle du Manitoba aura été la dernière!


Un BBQ-bénéfice bien arrosé!
 

Il était de circonstance que le BBQ-bénéfice organisé le 9 mai à Ottawa se déroule sous la pluie. D'une certaine façon, son but n'était-il pas de venir en aide aux victimes des inondations au Manitoba? Trempés jusqu'aux os, les participants se retrouvaient un peu dans le même bain.
 

Répondant à l'invitation du ministère de la Diversification de l'économie de l'Ouest, plus de 3 000 personnes sont allées se divertir au parc Constitution Square. Au programme : concerts en direct, nourriture fournie par Loeb et rafraîchissements offerts gracieusement par Coca Cola. Parmi les participants, mentionnons le ministre Manley, qui a affronté la pluie sous un grand parapluie bleu. Marian Kremers, victime de l'inondation qui était arrivée à Ottawa le jour du BBQ, a montré à M. Manley des photos de sa maison inondée. « Un soutien comme celui-ci nous fait chaud au coeur », déclare-t-elle.

Marty Muldoon et Phil Rodrigue, organisateurs de l'événement, évaluent à plus de 37 000 $ le montant recueilli, auquel s'ajoutera une contribution de 50 000 $ de la Municipalité régionale d'Ottawa-Carleton. M. Muldoon, manifestement très heureux, a indiqué à Argus que l'on n'aurait pu atteindre ce résultat sans l'appui généreux des entreprises de la région de la capitale nationale.

Si les gens d'Ottawa n'étaient pas sur place pour empiler les sacs de sable, ils n'ont pas hésité à prêter main-forte à leurs voisins de l'Ouest en cette période difficile.

 

Related Links

---

 

Home Page

Page d'accueil

What's New ?

Quoi de neuf ?

Main Menu

Menu Principal

Roll Call

Appel nominal

Timeline

Chronologie

Topics

Sujets

Documents

Documents

Contact Us

Nous rejoindre