RADIOALUMNI.CA

CANADIAN EPICS IN RADIOCOMMUNICATION

ALUMNI WHO LIVED THE ADVENTURE OF RADIO

WIRELESS TELEGRAPHISTS  -  SPARKS  -  RADIO PIONEERS

RADIO OPERATORS  -  RADIO TECHNICIANS

RADIO TECHNOLOGISTS  -  RADIO ENGINEERS

RADIO INSPECTORS  -  SPECTRUM MANAGERS

ÉPOPÉES CANADIENNES EN RADIOCOMMUNICATION

LES ANCIENS QUI ONT VÉCU L'AVENTURE DE LA RADIO

TÉLÉGRAPHISTES SANS FIL  -  PIONNIERS DE LA RADIO

OPÉRATEURS RADIO  -  TECHNICIENS RADIO

TECHNOLOGUES RADIO  -  INGÉNIEURS RADIO

INSPECTEURS RADIO  -  GESTIONNAIRES DU SPECTRE

Home Page

Page d'accueil

What's New ?

Quoi de neuf ?

Main Menu

Menu Principal

Roll Call

Appel nominal

Timeline

Chronologie

Topics

Sujets

Documents

Documents

Contact Us

Nous rejoindre

 

(French text follows English text  -  Texte en français suit le texte en anglais)

1967

Interfering with Interference

by William Dunstan
Information Services

 

In 1927, Ralph Bunt occasionally broke the tedium of life as a radio operator on Nottingham Island, where Hudson Strait opens into Hudson Bay, by hunting seal.

 

In 1930 Ralph Bunt, above, investigated radio interference with the aid of headphones, a portable receiver and loop antenna. 

 

Today John Demers (in fur hat) and Bob Coxe, Ottawa, are shown tracing sources of interference by means of an all-wave communications receiver mounted in a specially constructed radio van.

When Ralph Bunt joined the civil service as a ship's radio operator back in 1925, he was nicknamed "Sparks" along with the rest of his fraternity. The name originated with the first type of wireless transmitter, which broadcasted dots and dashes by shooting electricity across a gap between two terminals in the form of an arc, or spark. These bursts of energy went into the air from the ship's aerial to be picked up by receiving sets.

 

But times have changed. The sparks that were then the life force of radio communications still are with us, but they no longer are wanted. For they remain as the static created by automotive and electrical motors, short circuits, and a variety of electrical disturbances. In a more sophisticated age of electronics, they constitute a recurrent nuisance which Ralph Bunt, in his later capacity as part of the radio inspection service, has been seeking out and trying to eliminate for the past 36 years.

 

The early part of his service was high adventure. In 1926 he was radio operator aboard a revenue cutter engaged in trying to break up the lucrative, private foreign-aid program of supplying rum to thirsty, prohibition-bound Americans. There were storms which he recalls with no pleasure - one blanketed everything so heavily with ice that he barely managed to get a radio signal which helped the skipper find his bearings. The weight of the ice had created a dangerous list long before the ship staggered into port. Nor did he get much pleasure when the customs officers seized $40,000 in contraband rum hidden under a dock: the entire load-"except for a few bottles that may have been quietly set aside"- was poured down the drain!

 

Next, he went as a radio operator with the Hudson Straits expedition which in 1927 began a study of ice formation and other conditions in the area which formed a basis for the es­tablishment of the port of Churchill. In 1929, by which time he was in charge of one of the radio stations there, he was posted to Ottawa and in 1930 joined the radio inspection service.

 

Inspections then included, in addition to tracking down interference, inspection of radio licenses for broadcast receivers and prosecution of radio owners who had not purchased a license, as was required in those days.

 

There are no such license checks nowadays, but still they manage to keep busy. There are some 32 field offices throughout Canada - from Whitehorse, Yukon to St. John's, Newfoundland - from which approximately 175 inspectors investigate an average of 17,000 complaints of interference, travelling about 800,000 miles a year in 80 specially-equipped automobiles.

 

Inspectors also check the operation of all radio stations, to ensure that their equipment meets specifications, they keep to their own wavelength, and operate only within the terms of their licenses. Ship radios, for instance, must meet the minimum standards of the International Safety of Life at Sea Convention.

 

Examination of all candidates for radio operators certificates is another duty of the inspectors. Canada's standards are well above the minimum international standard and our certificates are highly regarded throughout the world.

 

Tracking down and rectifying radio interference hasn't changed basically during Ralph Bunt's service. A major implement then-and now-is a large, two-handed mallet with which the inspector goes about whacking power poles. This is not as silly as it may seem. Interference often is caused by some loose connection in an electronic field. Connections and other hardware concerned with wind-tossed, weather-beaten power lines and supporting posts are apt to come somewhat loose or lose insulation in the course of time. Whacking the pole sets up extensive vibrations which are almost certain to expose to the inspector's instruments any faults that have been responsible for radio interference.

 

A major cause of interference for many years was a variety of heating pads. One guilty little heating pad could disrupt radio reception in an entire neighbourhood. Tracking it down was not usually difficult. The inspectors drove around in their specially­equipped car, playing an electronic version of "hide-the-thimble". They could tell when they were "hot" or "cold" by the level of disturbance.When it "peaked", they knew they were in the immediate vicinity. Improvements in heating-pad design have almost eliminated this source of disturbance. Any faulty electrical appliance, however, can disrupt both radio and television reception. A frequent offender these days is the fluorescent light some of them are improperly filtered, resulting in interference.

 

There always is a shortage of radio inspectors, partly because to date it has been necessary to recruit them from fully qualified radio operators. The situation should improve in the near future, if plans materialize for graduates of technical schools to be hired and trained at D.O.T.'s Air Services School.

Inspectors currently undergo considerable retraining to keep them up to date with developments in the field. Ralph Bunt, whose radio experience dates back to 1920, when he first became a "ham" radio operator, frequently lectures at the department's own school.

 

A radio inspector needs many sterling qualities, not the least of which is the ability to understand and get along with people. He is, Mr. Bunt claims, the only civil servant who is required to do his work in private homes and, since complaints frequently can erupt into neighbourhood quarrels, he often must be a pretty adept psychologist as well as a skilled technician.

 

Bashing a power pole with a mallet, John Demers uses the standard method of setting up vibration on a line to check for faulty connections. Bob Coxe checks the communications receiver for any interference which may result from the blow.

 

 

1967

Suppression du brouillage

par William Dunstan

Services d'information

 

En 1927, Ralph Bunt, qui était alors opérateur radio sur l'île Nottingham, où le détroit d'Hudson débouche dans la baie du même nom, brisait à l'occasion la monotonie de son travail en chassant le phoque.

 

En 1930, Ralph Bunt, ci-dessus, repérait les sources de brouillage au moyen d'écouteurs, d'un récepteur portatif et d'un cadre. 

 

De nos jours, John Demers (portant casque en fourrure) et Bob Coxe, Ottawa (photo ci-contre) repèrent les sources de brouillage au moyen d'un récepteur de trafic toutes ondes, installé dans une voiture spécialement construite à cette fin.

A son entrée dans la Fonction publique en 1925 à titre d'opérateur radio de navire, Ralph Bunt fut affublé du surnom «Sparks» (étincelles) que portaient également ses collègues. Ce surnom remonte à l'époque du premier type d'émetteur de tsf qui transmettait des points et des traits au moyen d'impulsions électriques entre deux pôles sous forme d'arc ou d'étincelle. L'énergie qui jaillissait dans l'atmosphère en passant par l'antenne du navire était captée par les appareils récepteurs.

 

Les temps ont changé. Les étincelles qui constituaient l'essence même des radiocommunications existent toujours mais leur présence n'est plus souhaitée. Elles sont à la source des parasites produits par les moteurs d'automobile et électriques, les courts circuits et diverses perturbations d'origine électrique. En dépit des progrès que connaît l'électronique, ces parasites persistent toujours, et Ralph Bunt, du service d'inspection de la radio, s'applique depuis 36 ans à les déceler et à les supprimer.

 

Ses premières années de service furent fort aventureuses. En 1926, il occupe un poste d'opérateur radio à bord d'un cotre des douanes chargé de mettre fin au commerce lucratif consistant à fournir du rhum aux Américains qu'assoiffait la prohibition. M. Bunt se rappelle certaines tempêtes qui n'étaient pas de tout repos; au cours de l'une d'elles, la couche de glace recouvrant le navire était si épaisse qu'il réussit à peine à capter un signal radio devant permettre au capitaine de faire le point. Le navire, en raison du poids de la glace, donnait fortement de la bande bien avant d'entrer au port, tant bien que mal. Mais Bunt n'était pas trop enchanté quand les douaniers saisirent du rhum de contrebande pour une valeur de $40,000 caché sous un quai; toute la cargaison, «sauf quelques bouteilles mises discrètement de côté», fut déversée dans les égouts.

 

Il fait ensuite partie, à titre d'opérateur radio, de l'expédition du détroit d'Hudson qui en 1927 entreprend dans cette région une étude de la formation des glaces et d'autres conditions en vue d'y établir le port de Churchill. En 1929, alors qu'il a la charge d'une des stations radio de l'endroit, il est affecté à Ottawa et entre en 1930 au Service d'inspection de la radio.

 

A cette époque, en plus de repérer les sources de brouillage, l'inspecteur devait examiner les licences radio des propriétaires de récepteurs et poursuivre ceux qui n'en avaient pas.

 

De nos jours, même s'il n'a pas à effectuer ce travail, l'inspecteur a de quoi s'occuper. Le Service d'inspection compte environ 32 bureaux disséminés par tout le Canada, de Whitehorse (Yukon) à Saint-Jean (Terre-Neuve). Le personnel comprend environ 175 inspecteurs qui examinent en moyenne 17,000 cas de brouillage et parcourent environ 800,000 milles par année dans 80 automobiles dotées d'un matériel spécial.

 

L'inspecteur contrôle également l'exploitation de toutes les stations radio pour s'assurer que leur matériel répond aux normes, qu'elles ne s'écartent pas des fréquences qui leur ont été assignées et qu'elles ne sont utilisées qu'en conformité des conditions mentionnées dans leurs licences. Par exemple, les stations radio de navire doivent satisfaire aux normes minimums de la Convention internationale pour la sauvegarde de la vie humaine en mer.

 

L'examen des candidats aux certificats d'opérateur radio constitue une autre fonction des inspecteurs. Les normes fixées par le Canada dans ce domaine sont bien supérieures aux normes minimums internationales et nos certificats sont très bien cotés dans le monde entier.

 

Les méthodes de repérage et de suppression du brouillage n'ont pas changé fondamentalement depuis que Ralph Bunt a commencé à s'occuper de ce travail. L'outil dont l'inspecteur se servait surtout alors et dont il se sert encore dans la plupart des cas demeure un gros maillet avec lequel il frappe à coups redoublés sur les poteaux qui supportent les lignes de transmission. Ce manège n'est pas aussi stupide qu'on pourrait le croire. Le brouillage est souvent causé par une connexion lâche dans un champ électrique. Les connexions et autres ferrures des lignes de transmission et des poteaux à la merci des intempéries finissent par se desserrer et par perdre leur qualité isolante. Les coups répetés sur les poteaux produisent de fortes vibrations grâce auxquelles l'inspecteur décèle, à l'aide de ses instruments, les défectuosités à l'origine du brouillage.

 

Durant plusieurs années, le coussin chauffant a constitué une source importante de brouillage. La réception radio pouvait être brouillée dans tout un quartier par un seul coussin en mauvais état. Le repérage était habituellement facile. Les inspecteurs circulaient dans leur voiture, munie du matériel approprié, et jouaient une version «électronique» d'un jeu d'enfant; c'est ainsi que le niveau du brouillage leur indiquait s'ils «brûlaient» ou s'ils «gelaient». Si le niveau était au maximum, ils se trouvaient dans le voisinage immédiat de la source. Cette source de brouillage a presque disparu en raison des améliorations apportées aux coussins chauffants. Toutefois, tout appareil défectueux peut nuire à la réception des émissions de radio et de télévision. De nos jours, il en est souvent ainsi des appareils d'éclairage fluorescents qui ne sont pas munis de filtres appropriés.

 

Il y a toujours pénurie d'inspecteurs; c'est que, jusqu'ici, on devait les recruter parmi les opérateurs radio attitrés. La situation devrait s'améliorer sous peu si le projet d'engager des diplômés d'écoles techniques et de les former à l'École des Services de l'Air du ministère des Transports se réalise.

 

Pour se tenir au fait des perfectionnements qui interviennent dans leur domaine, les inspecteurs doivent subir un recyclage très poussé. Ralph Bunt, dont l'expérience en radio remonte à 1920 alors qu'il était radioamateur, enseigne fréquemment à l'école du Ministère.

 

Un inspecteur doit posséder de nombreuses qualités, notamment celle de pouvoir comprendre les gens et de s'entendre avec eux. Au dire de M. Bunt, c'est le seul fonctionnaire tenu d'effectuer son travail dans des maisons privées et comme les plaintes peuvent souvent dégénérer en querelles entre voisins, il doit être un psychologue doublé d'un technicien compétent.

 

En frappant, au moyen d'un maillet, un poteau supportant une ligne de transmission, Jean Demers utilise la méthode classique pour produire sur une ligne des vibrations permettant de déceler toutes connexions défectueuses. Bob Coxe, au moyen du récepteur de trafic, vérifie si les coups de maillet produisent du brouillage.

 

Related Links

---

 

Home Page

Page d'accueil

What's New ?

Quoi de neuf ?

Main Menu

Menu Principal

Roll Call

Appel nominal

Timeline

Chronologie

Topics

Sujets

Documents

Documents

Contact Us

Nous rejoindre